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Netflix Attacks Consumer Privacy Law

Today Netflix announced that it has launched a DC lobbbying campaign against a federal privacy law that protects customer video rental information. The company, which is already under fire for dramatic hikes in the subscription price of its once popular DVD rental program, now claims that the privacy law prevents Facebook users from posting information about NetFlix on Facebook. According to OpenSecrets, operated by the Center for Responsive Politics, Netflix has ramped up its Washington influence, spending almost $200,000 in 2011, up from $20,000 in 2009. EPIC has described the Video Privacy Protection Act as "one of the strongest protections of consumer privacy against a specific form of data collection." The law always had an exception for user consent, which means that Facebook users are free to disclose information about the videos they rent. But NetFlix wants "blanket consent" so that all Netflix use will be posted routinely to Facebook. For more information, see EPIC: Video Privacy Protection Act.

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